The Queens of Trivia and Thank You For Playing

This is it. The 30 days are up, and all the points have been counted. We know we have said this a million times before, but we have truly enjoyed hosting this trivia game.  We have learned a lot during the last month, and, more importantly, we have watched our followers learn as well. Some questions resulted in essay answers that have been highly amusing to read.

Who knows, maybe we’ll do this again one day, but for now, we need to focus on bigger and better things. We have something very exciting coming up in May, but you will have to stay tuned to find out what that very secret thing is.

Until then, let’s wrap up this game of trivia. First, the last five questions and answers:

Answers and Bonus Points

In case you are interested, here is the list of the second batch of questions and the answers we awarded points to:

#56 Correct the mistake: Has she wrote you back? (1 pt)

One point for changing “wrote” to “written.”

#57 Dialogue tags and action tags are otherwise known as… (2 pts)

Two points for naming attributions and beats. One point if only one was given.

#58 Who was the first kid to find a golden ticket to the chocolate factory in the novel Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl? (1 pt)

One point for Augustus Gloop. Bonus point for extra information on the character of Augustus.

#59 Correct the mistake: She said, “you are not alone.” (1 pt)

One point for changing the y to a capital letter.

#60 What do restrictive and nonrestrictive clauses mean to the placement of commas? (2 pts)

Two points for saying that nonrestrictive clauses require commas before and/or after it, and restrictive clauses do not.

BQ#4 Name all three Brontë sisters (3 pts)

Three points for naming Charlotte, Anne, and Emily. A bonus point for mentioning the other children of that family: Mary, Elizabeth (both of which died at early age) and Patrick.

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For better explanations for answers, check out the trivia site, EBStrivia.tumblr.com, and read the Answer posts. If you would like any of the answers to be explained more fully, please feel free to suggest for us to do so by commenting on this post or contacting the admins.

Scoreboard

The top three have been removed from this list. They get their own spotlight.

Kathy – 40 points

Melissa – 34.5 points

Ale – 34 points

Iris – 22 points

Daphodill – 6 points

Amanda K – 4 points

Idealskeptic – 4 points

Katie Cav – 2 points

Kat and Crystal – 1 point each

The Queens of Trivia

Third place goes to Ooza, who had 41 points at the end of the game.

Second place goes to LisbethTejada, who had racked up 83 points in the end.

3rd_Ooza 2nd_LisbethTejada

Anna earned her first place with whooping 91 points!

Anna earned her first place with whooping 91 points!

Fun fact: the total points available in this game, including bonus questions, were 91. Many questions also allowed for bonus points to be awarded, so participants could have ended up with 100 points or more. Many times we were compelled to award bonus points, especially to these top three ladies, who often provided detailed responses or hilarious commentary.

That’s It, and Thank You All For Playing!

30 Days of Trivia, Fourth Roundup

The 30 Days of Trivia is coming to an end, but there are still a few more questions left to answer. As this is the case, we have decided not to publish the scoreboard this week, but instead wait until later this week when we post the final results.

However, we still have lots of questions to review from the last week. So, without further ado, here are the answers and bonus points from the fourth round:

Answers and Bonus Points

In case you are interested, here is the list of the second batch of questions and the answers we awarded points to:

#42 Why is the name “preposition” no longer accurate for words like “for,” “to,” “up,” etc.? (1 pt)

One point for mentioning that these prepositions are no longer required to be positions before (or “pre”) the word or phrase it modifies. A bonus point was awarded for a good explanation.

#43 He was an Oxford scholar, an English professor, and a member of the Inklings. Born in South Africa, he was highly influenced by religion in his writings. (1 pt)

One point for J. R. R. Tolkien.

#44 Correct the mistake: Who are you sending this to? (1 pt)

We gave right for “Whom are you sending this to” and “To whom are you sending this.” Bonus point for providing both examples.

#45 When a verb is said to be strong, what does that mean? (1 pt)

One point for saying that the verb gets irregular endings in the past tense, usually by changing a vowel sound. A bonus point was awarded for a very funny explanation.

#46 How many books are in the trilogy The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams (1 pt)

One point for five.

#47 Correct the mistake: The Joneses have brown eye’s. (1 pt)

One point for changing “eye’s” to “eyes.”

#48 “Anthology” is a word derived from the Greek word “anthologie,” which means what?

One point for “a bouquet of flowers” or any variant of that.

#49 “Why is the raven like a writing desk?” Where is that question from, and what was the reply? (2 pts)

Two points for Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and “I haven’t the slightest idea.” Bonus point for mentioning some of the possible answers Carroll provided.

#50 Correct the mistake: The dog’s are all neutered. (1 pt)

One point for changing “dog’s” to “dogs.”

#51 Where would you put the modifier “only” in the sentence, “Cecilia dances when she is drunk,” if you mean that Cecilia alone dances while others are sober? (1 pt)

No one got this right. “Only” should be placed before “she.”

#52 On what date did Stephenie Meyer have the dream that lead her to write Twilight? (1 pt)

One point for June 2, 2003. Bonus point for correcting the question and replacing “lead” with “led,” and for mentioning that after that dream she drafted what would become chapter 13 of Twilight.

#53 Correct the mistake: I’m going to lay down for a quick nap. (1 pt)

One point for changing “lay” to “lie.”

#54 The sentence, “Ringing in the distance, Mike needed to answer the phone,” is an example of what? (1 pt)

One point for saying it’s an example of a misplaced modifier.

#55 She is the main character of a famous novel first published in 1813. The second of five daughters, she’s intelligent, pretty and witty. She also tends to judge people before getting to know them. She married one of the wealthiest men in the country and lived happily ever after. Name this fictional character and the novel. (2 pts)

Two points for Elizabeth Bennet and Pride and Prejudice.

BQ#3 This American writer is considered to be an inventor of this sub-genre of criminal genre and is best known for his macabre stories. Name the writer, the sub-genre and any story written by him (3 pts)

Three points for naming Edgar Allan Poe, detective fiction, and any of his stories (The Black Cat, The Mask of the Red Death, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, etc.).

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For better explanations for answers, check out the trivia site, EBStrivia.tumblr.com, and read the Answer posts. If you would like any of the answers to be explained more fully, please feel free to suggest for us to do so by commenting on this post or contacting the admins.

Bonus Question!

This one should be easy…

BQ#4 Name all three Brontë sisters (3 pts)

Answers should be submitted using the usual methods (click here). Please identify the question number as BQ#4.

The answer will be revealed at the next roundup, so everyone is free to submit an answer until then.

30 Days of Trivia, Third Roundup

The third week of the 30 Days of Trivia game is over, and we are ready to share with you an updated scoreboard. It’s such a pleasure to see that your interest in this game is still high, and some of your answers are so elaborate we learn new things from you as well. Thank you!

If you haven’t participated already, we still encourage you to try. We guarantee it to be fun and a great learning experience regardless of the score. We hope you join us!

And now, here is the list of trivia participants in order of highest to lowest scores:

Scoreboard

AnnaLund2011 – 65 points

Lisbeth Tejada – 53 points

Kathy – 28 points

Ooza – 27 points

Melissa – 26.5 points

Ale – 23 points

Iris – 19 points

Amanda K – 4 points

Daphodill – 6 points

Idealskeptic – 4 points

Katie Cav – 2 points

Kat and Crystal – 1 point each

 

Answers and Bonus Points

In case you are interested, here is the list of the second batch of questions and the answers we awarded points to:

#28 This novella written in 1951 won a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, and was credited as a major contributing factor to the awarding of a Nobel Prize in Literature to its author. Name the novel and the author. (2 pts) 

Two points for identifying The Old Man and The Sea by Ernest Hemingway. Bonus points for including information about when the novella was published and won the Pulitzer.

#29 Correct the mistake: I’ve never seen a bluer sky then when I was in Greece. (1 pt)

One point for  using “than” instead of “then”. “Then” means “at that time” or “after that.” In this case, “then” should be changed to “than,” which indicates a comparison or contrast.

#30 Find the concrete noun in this sentence: On this gray day he dreamed of a rainbow. (1 pt)

One point for identifying “rainbow” as the concrete noun. A concrete noun is something you can experience with at least one of the five senses: touch, taste, smell, see, or hear.

#31 What are the last two lines of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18? (1 pt)

One point if you answered, “So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, / So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.”

#32 Correct the mistake: Between you and I, this is complete nonsense. (1 pt)

One point for saying “I” should be “me.”

#33 Which narrative mode displays a single character’s thought process in what seems to be a string of random observations? (1 pt)

One point for saying “stream of consciousness”.  Writers such as Virgina Woolf and James Joyce were one of the first to experiment with this narrative mode.

#34 Name that character: He is of unknown age but is definitely old. He has magic powers and has been known to change color. His name originates in Völuspá’s Catalogue of the Dwarves, though he himself is not a dwarf. (1 pt)

One point for naming Gandalf the Grey (and later, the White). Bonus point for referencing Nordic myths in relation to where the name comes from.

#35 Correct the mistake: The stars compliment the moon; without them, the moon looks lonely. (1 pt)

One point if you suggested to use “complement” instead of “compliment”. “Compliment” means to praise someone or something. “Complement” means to complete something or improve it. The stars complement the moon.

#36 Name the seven coordinating conjunctions. (3 pts)

Three points if you named the FANBOYS: “for”, “and”, “nor”, “but”, “or”, “yet”, “so.”

#37  The author of this 1831 novel succeeded in building up excitement about the story months before it was finished by posting “teasers” and related articles. Despite a five month delay in publication, it was sold out instantly. Hint: What would you do if you found a magical artifact fulfilling your every desire? Name the author and the novel. (2 pts)

Two points if you named The Magic Skin (or Le peau de chagrin) by Honore de Balzac. Bonus point for mentioning both the English title and the original.

#38 Correct the mistake: Martin fought hard to keep his job; but he lost. (1 pt)

One point for replacing a semicolon with a comma. Semicolons are not supposed to be used with coordinating conjunctions when joining two independent clauses.

#39 Is this a simile, a metaphor, or an analogy? “The book was to her what the blanky was to her baby brother—a sense of security.” (1 pt)

One point if you identified it as analogy.  Analogy means comparing of two things by pointing out shared characteristics.

#40 Which literary work is Lion King derived from? Please include the author. (2 pts)

Two points for saying Hamlet by William Shakespeare.

#41 Correct the mistake: You and I are talking about grammar. (1 pt)

One point if you found this sentence to be correct. It was a trick question!

BQ#2 This popular novel for children has been winning readers’ hearts since 1988. The main character of the story is an extraordinary child with a brilliant mind, a heart of gold, and very unpleasant (if not shady) parents. The story is full of pranks involving telekinetic powers, superglue, and hostile headmistresses. What is the name of the character and who wrote this story? (2 pts)

Two points for naming Roald Dahl and Matilda. 

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For better explanations for answers, check out the trivia site, EBStrivia.tumblr.com, and read the Answer posts. If you would like any of the answers to be explained more fully, please feel free to suggest for us to do so by commenting on this post or contacting the admins.

Bonus Question!

BQ#3 This American writer is considered to be an inventor of this sub-genre of criminal genre and is best known for his macabre stories. Name the writer, the sub-genre and any story written by him (3 pts)

Answers should be submitted using the usual methods (click here). Please identify the question number as BQ#3.

The answer will be revealed at the next roundup, so everyone is free to submit an answer until then.

30 Days of Trivia, Second Roundup

The second week of the 30 Days of Trivia game zoomed by, and we are ready with an updated scoreboard. We have loved to see your enthusiasm during this game, and we are happy to see that so many people either know the answers or have gone ahead and studied each subject before answering.

If you haven’t participated already and are worried to start out way behind, don’t worry. There are still 33 questions left, and even more points to be awarded. There is still a chance to overtake the top participants, though we suspect they will be working harder than ever to maintain their positions.

So, without further ado, here is the list of trivia participants in order of highest to lowest scores:

Scoreboard

AnnaLund2011 – 41 points

Lisbeth Tejada – 34 points

Kathy – 22 points

Ooza – 16 points

Melissa – 15.5 points

Iris – 13 points

Ale – 12 points

Amanda K – 4 points

Idealskeptic – 4 points

Daphodill – 4 points

Answers and Bonus Points

In case you are interested, here is the list of the second batch of questions and the answers we awarded points to:

#14 Correct the mistake: “Please bring me some butter”, she asked. (1 pt)

One point for moving the comma inside the quotation marks.

#15 Is this a simile, a metaphor, or an analogy? “The knife was sharp in her hand as she sat down to write a scathing letter to her council representative.” (1 pt)

One point for saying metaphor.

#16 Amy Sedaris is the sister of which famous writer? (1 pt)

One point for David Sedaris.

#17 Correct the mistake: “I don’t want to go!” he sniffled. (1 pt)

One point for eliminating “sniffled” as a dialogue tag. One bonus point for coming up with several correct versions. Possible versions:

  • “I don’t want to go!” He sniffled.
  • “I don’t want to go!” he said, sniffling.
  • Sniffling, he said, “I don’t want to go!”
  • He sniffled. “I don’t want to go!”

#18 What does “jargon” mean? (1 pt)

One point for saying it’s a vocabulary for a particular trade or profession (the dictionary, standard meaning). Bonus point for mentioning the connotation of it meaning gibberish.

#19 Which literary work is 10 Things I Hate About You derived from? Please include the author. (2 pts)

Two points for William Shakespeare and The Taming of the Shrew.

#20 Correct the mistake: I’m throwing a party this weekend, and your invited! (1 pt)

One point for changing “your” to “you’re.” We were especially happy to see all the horror-struck responses to this one.

#21 Is “ginormous” a real word? (1 pt)

One point for “yes.”

#22 Of Mice and Men is a reference to which poem by which poet? (2 pts)

Two points for Robert Burns and To a Mouse. Bonus point for quoting the poem (“The best laid schemes of mice and men go often awry,” or, as in the original, “The best-laid schemes o’ mice an’ men gang aft agley”).

#23 Correct the mistake: In theory, the placement of the sun is at the center of the solar system and Galileo Galilei did his best to prove that. (1 pt)

One point for adding a comma between “system” and “and.” Bonus point for coming up with several solutions (such as “solar system; Galileo Galilei” or “solar system. Galileo Galilei”).

#24 What is the past perfect tense used for? (1 pt)

One point for saying that it is used to express an action in the past that happened before another action in the past. Bonus point for pointing out that “perfect” comes from the latin for “to finish.”

#25 “[T]o die: to sleep—To sleep, perchance to dream” is a part of a famous speech in one of Shakespeare’s works. How does it start, and who speaks? (2 pts)

Two points for “To be or not to be, that is the question,” and Hamlet.

#26 Correct the mistake: I wanted to tell you; but you were ignoring me. (1 pt)

One point for changing the semicolon to a comma.

#27 Arrange from the biggest unit to the smallest: word, sentence, letter, morpheme, paragraph, phrase, clause. (3 pt)

Three points for: paragraph, sentence, clause, phrase, word, morpheme, letter. One or two points depending on how many words were correctly ordered.

BQ#1 Eugene Francois Vidocq was a criminal and a private detective who inspired the two main characters in a very famous novel/musical. Which novel, and who is the writer? (2 pts)

Two points for naming Victor Hugo and Les Misérables. Extra point for mentioning that Eugene also inspired writers such as Honoré de Balzac, Augste Dupin, Alexandre Dumas, Edgar Allan Poe, and others. Extra point for mentioning which two characters Eugene was the inspiration for: Inspecteur de police Javert and Jean Valjean.

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For better explanations for answers, check out the trivia site, EBStrivia.tumblr.com, and read the Answer posts. If you would like any of the answers to be explained more fully, please feel free to suggest for us to do so by commenting on this post or contacting the admins.

Bonus Question!

BQ#2 This popular novel for children has been winning readers’ hearts since 1988. The main character of the story is an extraordinary child with a brilliant mind, a heart of gold, and very unpleasant (if not shady) parents. The story is full of pranks involving telekinetic powers, superglue, and hostile headmistresses. What is the name of the character and who wrote this story?

Answers should be submitted using the usual methods (click here). Please identify the question number as BQ#2.

The answer will be revealed at the next roundup, so everyone is free to submit an answer until then.

30 Days of Trivia, First Roundup

It’s  been a week since we launched this program, and it has been very exciting so far. We have loved going over your answers and seeing how knowledgeable you are about certain subjects. Even when the answers have been wrong, we feel like we are learning something new while teaching at the same time.

If you haven’t participated already and are worried to start out way behind, don’t worry. There are still 47 questions left, and even more points to be awarded. And, as you will see below, some questions allow for the opportunity to add information to the answer, in which case we might award bonus points.

So, without further ado, here is the list of trivia participants in order of highest to lowest scores:

Scoreboard

AnnaLund2011 – 16 points

Lisbeth Tejada – 15 points

Melissa – 8.5 points

Ale – 7 points

Iris – 6 points

Kathy – 5 points

Amanda K – 4 points

Idealskeptic – 4 points

Ooza – 1 point

Answers and Bonus Points

In case you are interested, here is the list of the first twelve questions and the answers we awarded points to:

#1 Who compiled the stories of the legend of King Arthur and Merlin, and what is the title of the compilation? (2 pts)

No one answered this question correctly in time, but the answer was Thomas Malory and Le Morte D’Arthur.

#2 Correct the mistake: She asked him to keep it a secret, so he had to be discrete. (1 pt)

One point for replacing “discrete” with “discreet.”

#3 Name three typical spelling differences between American and British English. (3 pts)

Points given for o/ou (color/colour), ize/ise (realize/realise), er/re (theater/theatre) and single vs double consonant when adding -ing (traveling/travelling). Half a point for pyjamas vs. pajamas, as it is a spelling difference, but a difference for only that particular word.

#4 He was an Oxford scholar, an English professor, and a member of the Inklings. Born in Ireland, he was highly influenced by religion in his writings. (1 pt)

One point for C.S. Lewis.

#5 Correct the mistake: The boy cried “Wolf! Wolf!” (1 pt)

One point for adding a comma after “cried.”

#6 Is “yawned” a dialogue tag?

One point for saying “no.”

#7 Four writers were vacationing close to Lake Geneva. On one stormy night, the group decided to each write a ghost story to tell the others around the fire. This resulted in one of the most famous science fiction stories of all time, and indeed one of the first of its genre, written by the only woman in the group. What is the story, and who wrote it? (2 pts)

Two points for naming Mary Shelley and Frankenstein. Extra points for mentioning Galvani, whose ideas the group were discussing when they started their challenge, and for mentioning Mary Shelley’s full name (Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin), and the full title of the novel (Frankenstein: or The Modern Prometheus).

#8 Correct the mistake: Leave he and I alone, please. (2 pts)

One point for changing “he and I” into “us.” Two points for replacing “he” and “I” with “him” and “me.” One point if only one of the pronouns was changed.

#9 Is this a simile, a metaphor, or an analogy? “The falling snow was like little tufts of cotton drifting down from heaven.” (1 pt)

One point for simile.

#10 Many people might know the final movement of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony as Ode to Joy. Who wrote the poem that goes with that tune? (1 pt)

One point for Schiller or Friedrich Schiller.

#11 Correct the mistake: I went to the store, it was busy. (1 pt)

One point for changing the comma to a period or a semicolon, or for adding an “and” after the comma.

#12 What’s the difference between “denotation” and “connotation”? (1 pt)

One point for saying that denotation is the literal meaning and connotation is a meaning associated with the word. We got a few variations of these definitions, but they were all correct.

#13 What were the pen names of the Brontë sisters? (3 pts)

One point for each: Acton, Currer, and Ellis Bell. Extra point for mentioning that they used the middle name of Charlotte’s husband, Arthur Bell Nicholls, as their last name.

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For better explanations for answers, check out the trivia site, EBStrivia.tumblr.com, and read the Answer posts. If you would like any of the answers to be explained more fully, please feel free to suggest for us to do so by commenting on this post or contacting the admins.

Bonus Question!

BQ#1 Eugene Francois Vidocq was a criminal and a private detective who inspired the two main characters in a very famous novel/musical. Which novel, and who is the writer? (2 pts)

Answers should be submitted using the usual methods (click here). Please identify the question number as BQ#1.

The answer will be revealed at the next roundup, so everyone is free to submit an answer until then.

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